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ATS BULLETIN - 24/10/2014

  

Category: Endurance Performance 

Application: Middle / Long distance running, Triathlon, Cycling

 

Exercise training in normobaric hypoxia in endurance runners.

I. Improvement in aerobic performance capacity

  

 

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ATS BULLETIN 2014-10-24

 

Category             - Endurance Performance

Application         - Middle / Long distance running, Triathlon, Cycling

 

Research Overview

Title

Exercise training in normobaric hypoxia in endurance runners.

I. Improvement in aerobic performance capacity

Publish Date

April 2006

Authors

Stephane Ponsot, Elodie Ponsot, Joffrey Zoll et al.

Institution

Department of Physiology, Strasbourg, France

Number / Type of Participants

18 Male highly trained distance runners; 30.3±6.3 yrs

Altitude Level

14.5% O2 / 3,000m; Temp: 21-23oC

 

Executive Summary

Six weeks of twice weekly high intensity treadmill running in simulated altitude resulted in superior results compared to the equivalent sea level training. Specific performance adaptations observed following simulated altitude training included:

  • A significant increase in VO2 max in already highly trained runners

  • An improvement in treadmill submaximal running speeds at both sea level and simulated altitude

  • An increase in run time to exhaustion at maximum running speed, indicating delayed in fatigue during high intensity endurance exercise

Overview of research programme

Split into 2 training groups of 9 with no significant differences in the physical characteristics between groups. Both groups trained on a motorised treadmill. The simulated altitude group trained with a face mask connected to a hypoxic generator; while sea level group trained in normal (ambient) air. The simulated altitude group were only connected to the hypoxic face mask during the high intensity running efforts; breathing ambient air during the warm-up and recovery run periods.

 

Training program: 2 days / week for 6 weeks

Session overview:

  • 10 min warm-up @60% vVO2max

  • 2 x running efforts @90% vVO2max
    • The 2 x running efforts were separated by 5 min of active recovery @60% vVO2max during which they inspired ambient air

  • 5 min cool-down @60% vVO2max

 

 

Key Outcomes

 

Pre to post training resulted in specific performance improvements observed in the simulated altitude group only, including:

  • An increase of 5% in relative VO2 max in both sea level and simulated altitude conditions

  • Faster velocities at submaximal (↑ of 7-8%) and maximal (↑ by 5%) during treadmill running

  • An increase by 35% in run time till exhaustion at maximum run speed

 

 

Training Program

 

Stage

Exercise

Total Time

Interval Time

RPE

% Max Speed

Target

SA02

Treadmill Running

 

 

 

 

 

Warm Up

10 min @ 60% vVO2max*

10.00

10.00

4

60%

85

Running Effort 1

12 min @ 90% vVO2max

22.00

12.00

8-10

90%

80

Active Recovery

5 min @ 60% vVO2max

27.00

5.00

4

60%

85

Running Effort 2

12 min @ 90% vVO2max

39.00

12.00

8-10

90%

80

Cool Down

5 min @ 60% vVO2max

44.00

5.00

4

60%

85

*% vVO2max refers to the percentage of maximum speed reached during the pre-training treadmill test