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ATS BULLETIN - 22/09/2014

Category: REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY 

Application: Field Sports: League / union; soccer, AFL, hockey

 

Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia

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ATS BULLETIN 2014-09-22

 

Category             - REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY

Application         - Field Sports: League / union; soccer, AFL, hockey

 

Research Overview

Title

Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia

Publish Date

November 2013

Authors

Harvey Galvin, Karl Cooke, David Sumners et al.

Institution

Department of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University

Number / Type of Participants

30 Males; 18.4 ± 1.5 yrs; Well-trained rugby league / union players

Altitude Level

13% O2 / 4,000m

 

Executive Summary

Four weeks of repeated sprint training in simulated altitude led superior improvements in sprinting performance; combined with an increase in oxygen consumption and delayed fatigue during repeated sprint running efforts. Specific benefits following simulated altitude training included:

  • A significantly greater distance covered during the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery test

  • The tendency to consume a higher amount of oxygen during repeat sprint treadmill running

  • Maintenance of a higher sprinting speed during repeated sprint running efforts

Overview of research programme

Split into 2 groups of 15; matched for body size and fitness levels. Both groups trained on a non-motorised treadmill, attached to a face mask connected to a hypoxic generator. The inspired gas concentration of the mask system was set to simulate altitude conditions in one group, and sea-level in the second group.

Training program: 3 days / week for 4 weeks

Session overview:

  • 15 min warm-up incorporating sport specific running

  • 3 x 20 metre maximum sprints; 3 min rest between efforts

  • 10 x 6 sec all out sprint efforts; 30 sec rest between efforts

  • 5 min static recovery

 

Key Outcomes

 

Pre to post training improvements occurred following simulated altitude training only including:

  • A significant increase (↑ 33%) in the distance covered during the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test

  • The tendency for a greater increase (↑ 6.9%) in the total amount of oxygen consumed during repeated sprint testing.

  • An improved ability to maintain a higher sprinting speed (↑ 27%), along with a tendency to cover a greater distance during repeated sprint testing.

 

 

Training Program

 

Stage

Exercise

Total Time

Interval Time

RPE

SPEED

Target

SA02

Treadmill – Repeat Sprint Efforts

 

 

 

 

 

Warm Up

Sport specific running , dynamic stretching and acceleration drills

15.00

15.00

3-4

NA

 

Running Sprints*

3 x 20 metre sprint efforts

(3 min rest between sprint reps)

25.00

10.00

10

Maximal

85

Treadmill Sprints**

 

10 x 6-sec all out sprints

(30-sec recovery between sprint reps)

32.00

7.00

10

Maximal

85

Recovery

5 min passive exposure

37.00

5.00

NA

NA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Running sprints completed on an indoor training surface

** Treadmill sprints completed on a non-motorised treadmill